Showing 194 results

Authority record

BCIT. Library Services

  • Corporate body
  • 1964-

In 1962, shortly after assuming the Office of Principal, Cecil Roper called a meeting with senior staff at the UBC library to discuss how the library needs of BCIT students could be best met. Together with Sophie Laddy, Head of Science and Technology Division of the Vancouver Public Library an Advisory Committee was formed. The first meeting of the Committee was held on December 17, 1962. In 1964, Joan Jorgensen was appointed Head Librarian.
The library originally occupied a 4375 square foot space room in the main building of the Burnaby Campus. Basic materials were housed for general courses such as Physics, Mathematics, English and Chemistry with the intent to expand the collection to include materials on technologies taught at the Institute such as engineering, electronics, and business, forestry, medical and mining technologies. By 1966, the library had outgrown its allocated space. The Advisory Committee, under the leadership of Basil J. Stuart Stubbs, Head Librarian at UBC, submitted plans that were eventually approved, for the construction of a new library building.
The new building officially opened for service in August 1968. The new premises occupied two floors of 19,000 square feet each, providing adequate space to seat 500 students and to have a collection of 100,000 volumes. Provision was also made for a student lounge, a fully equipped student typing and calculating room, a microfilm reading room and a faculty reading room.
That same year Robert Harris succeeded Jorgensen as Head Librarian. The following year the service of providing audio-visual aids and equipment was incorporated into the library as the Audio-Visual Department. The Information Resource Centre was thus formed and came under the direction of Harris. Harris resigned in 1975 and was succeeded by Jos Carver. Under Carver, the automation of library operations began. By 1979, 75,000 records had been converted to microfiche. In 1983, IBM’s integrated library system DOBIS was purchased to meet the library’s needs. BCIT was the first academic library in Canada to have a computer database of resources.
In 1985, following administrative reorganization of the institute, Paula Pick was selected as Institute Librarian for the new multi-campus library, which consisted of the amalgamated facilities, staff and collections of the former Pacific Vocational Institute and BCIT Library. The two institutes merged officially on April 1, 1986.
The position of Institute Librarian has been held by the following individuals:

  • Joan Jorgensen - 1962-1967
  • Robert Harris - 1968-1975
  • Jos Carver - 1976-1985
  • Paula Pick - 1985-1993
  • Brigitte Peter Cherneff - 1993-2007
  • David Pepper – 2008–2015
  • James Rout – 2016-2018
  • Alison Nussbaumer - 2018-present

BCIT. Marine Campus

  • Corporate body
  • 1975-

In 1975 the Marine Training Centre, began providing training in navigation and engineering. Following the establishment of the Marine Training Advisory Council in 1975, it was decided that the responsibilities of the Centre should be increased. As a result, in 1978, it was designated a Provincial Institute and renamed the Pacific Marine Training Institute (PMTI).

In 1994 the PMTI was amalgamated with the British Columbia Institute of Technology to become BCIT's Pacific Marine Training Campus.

BCIT. Marketing and Communications

  • Corporate body
  • 1974-

The BCIT Marketing and Communications Department began in 1974 in conjunction with BCIT’s first year as an autonomous entity under a Board of Governors rather than under the direct control of the British Columbia Department of Education. BCIT Principal Gordon A. Thom created three new Executive Directorships in this year: Technology and Education; Administration; and Personnel, Information Services and Student Services. The Marketing and Communications Department started as an area of service provided under the Executive Director, Personnel, Student Services and Information Services. It was known as Information Services although the term “communications” was used to describe its duties and responsibilities. The first Director of Information Services was recruited in 1975 and was responsible for information dissemination among BCIT staff, students, faculty and the public. Ensuring relevant parties were aware of decisions and developments at BCIT and providing a mechanism for feedback. In 1975 the Director of Information Services began work on an information policy for BCIT and revived the newsletter “Developments” which enhanced internal BCIT communications.
In 1977 Information Services was moved under the Human Resources Division. During this time Information Services continued its broad-based program of internal and external communications. The department served as liaison between federal and provincial governments on the residence project, participated in presentations on Bill 82, and began work on revitalizing the Alumni Association.
In 1979 Information Services, still under Vice President Human Resources, underwent a name change and was known as the Public Relations department.
After the merger with the Pacific Vocational Institute in 1985 the department was again moved and given a name change. Now known as Community Relations, the Director of Community Relations/Development reported to the Vice President of Student Services and Educational Support.

BCIT. Office of the President

  • Corporate body
  • 1959-

From BCIT's founding until 1974 the B.C. Department of Education in partnership with an Advisory Council, chosen from business and industry, appointed the Principal as the Chief Executive Officer of BCIT.

The three divisions of Engineering, Business and Health were managed by three Directors who reported directly to the Principal. The Advisory Council formed seventeen advisory committees which met at least twice a year and advised Technology Heads at BCIT about the effectiveness of the programs being taught, opportunities for employment and updates in the industry. Recommendations went through the Principal who carried them to the main Advisory Council.

A more autonomous relationship developed between the provincial government and BCIT with the passage of the British Columbia Institute of Technology Act on July 4, 1974. The Act established a new system of governance for the Institute under a fifteen–person Board of Governors. Under Section 11 (3) of the BCIT Act the Principal was required to submit an Annual Report to the Board of Governors for the educational year. The position of Principal was expanded to encompass linking functions both between the Board of Governors and the Institute, and between the Institute and the external community. The Principal assumed the responsibility of implementing Board policy and administering the budget; she also served as the chief means of mobilizing the institute’s resources in recognizing and clarifying issues and expediting decision making. At the same time, three Executive Director positions were created in the areas of Technical Education; Administration; and Personnel and Information Services and Student Services, in order that BCIT could effectively carry on day-to-day operations while implementing a variety of administrative systems. With the Directors of the five Educational Divisions, the Bursar, the Registrar, and the Coordinator of Planning Services, the Executive Directors were members of an Executive Committee, a consultative body which advised the Principal and served as a channel of communication between the Chief Executive Officer and BCIT's staff, students and faculty.

In 1986 when BCIT merged with the Pacific Vocational Institute the title of the Chief Executive Officer of BCIT changed from Principal to President.

In 2004, BCIT's governing legislation became the College and Institute Act, RSBC 1996, ch. 5 (2). Under this Act, the President is defined as the Institute's Chief Executive Office, with the duty to “supervise and direct subject to bylaws, the instructional, administrative and other staff of the institution and exercise powers and perform duties assigned to the president by the board.” The President is to report to the Board of Governors annually on the progress of BCIT, make recommendations, and advise the Board on all matters concerning the operation of BCIT.

Individuals who have served as Principal include: Gordon A. Thom, Principal (1974-1985), Cliff McAdam, Acting Principal (July-August 1974), Dean H. Goard, Principal (1967-June 1974) d Jan 1986, E. Cecil Roper, Principal (1962-1967)

Individuals who have served as President include: Kathy Kinloch, President (2014-), Don Wright, President (2008-2013), Verna Magee-Shepherd, Acting President (June 2007-March 2008), Tony Knowles, President (2000-May 2007), Brian Gillespie, President (1995-August 2000), John A. Watson, President (1989-1995), Roy V. Murray, President (1985-1988)

BCIT. Pioneers Club

  • Corporate body
  • 1994-2013

The Pioneers Club was formed in February, 1994. Membership was composed of faculty and staff who were employed at BCIT on or prior to June 15, 1966 and who contributed to the establishment of the two year diploma programs.

BCIT. Safety, Security and Emergency Management

  • Corporate body

The BCIT Safety, Security and Emergency Management department works with BCIT academic programs and service areas in providing a safe, secure and disaster resilient environment.

BCIT. School of Business

  • Corporate body
  • 1964-

Business was one of the three core areas of study available in 1964 when BCIT opened.
In 1990 the School of Business started going by its current name.

BCIT. School of Computing and Academic Studies

  • Corporate body

Departments within the school include: Academic Studies (Basic Health Sciences, Chemistry, Communication, Liberal Studies, Mathematics, and Physics), Computing and IT (Computing), and Forensics (Forensic Science & Technology).
Academic Studies, which includes the departments of Math, Chemistry, Physics, Communication, and Liberal Studies provide essential building blocks for technologies and credentials.
BCIT students are given applied and theoretical knowledge, as well as advanced skills in critical thinking, applied ethics, and research methodology for career success.
Academic Studies also manages the Technology Entry Program which bridges into BCIT credentials, as well as the Technical Writing Certificate.
The Computing and IT department works with industry and subject matter experts, and has developed 30 different Computing and IT career-oriented program options which lead to certificates, diplomas, and a bachelor’s degree, full-time and part-time.
Every year they also provide over 350 individual Part-time "COMP" courses at night and on weekends. Our alumni become the future managers, entrepreneurs and leaders in the Computing and IT sector.
The Forensics department offers flexibility and specialization. Options for students include degrees and specialty certificates in Forensic Science, Computer Crimes, Intelligence Analysis, Forensic Health Sciences and Forensic Video Analysis.

BCIT. School of Health Sciences

  • Corporate body
  • 1964-

In 1964 BCIT opened it’s doors with two Health programs; Medical Radiology and Medical Laboratory for a total of 73 students enrolled. BCIT shared training responsibility with various designated hospitals. On successful completion, the student was awarded a certificate.

Currently the School of Health Sciences runs programs in ten main areas of study: Basic Health Sciences (Part-time Studies) Biomedical Engineering Electrodiagnostics Food Safety and Processing Health Care Management Health Protection Laboratory Sciences Medical Imaging Technologies Nursing & Specialty Nursing Therapeutics
*These include degree and post-degree programs as well as the entry-level programs.

The School of Health Sciences maintains the quality and relevance of its health training programs through close liaison with employers and professional associations. Maintaining the traditions of BCIT there are Advisory committees for each program. Students can expect provincial, national and international accreditation; regular external and internal program assessments; a variety of professional development provisions for faculty and staff; and integration of a variety of learning strategies, including industrial experience through projects and practicums.

BCIT. School of Transportation

  • Corporate body
  • 2000-

Since 2000 the BCIT School of Transportation has been a North American leader in transportation training, producing the high-quality, job-ready graduates in demand by the aerospace, marine, motive, and rail sectors.

Strategically located directly at the Asia Pacific Gateway, the School of Transportation delivers accredited and globally recognized programs tailored to meet the human capital needs of the transportation industry.

The School of Transportation has its roots in BCIT's School of Trades Training Apprenticeship Programs; drawing from Apprenticeship Programs, Aviation Trades and Mechanical Trades.

BCIT. Student Association

  • Corporate body
  • 1966-

Between 1965 and 1974 the BCIT Student Association was primarily concerned with student’s social and recreational activities, particularly sports. Funding for Student Association activities were provided by an activity fee of $15 levied against each student. In 1966 the Association produced its first year book. In 1969 the SA successfully lobbied the provincial government for the construction of a Student Activity Centre. The construction of the Centre was completed in 1971. In 1983, phase 1 of the new Campus Centre was opened. The building was to include racquet ball courts and office spaces. Phase 2 would include a new pub and cafeteria.

BCIT Student Society executives include the following individuals:

1965-1966 Kenneth McLean 1966-1967 Eric Schultz 1967-1968 Douglas Hall 1968-1969 Brian Hall 1969-1970 Julio Russo 1970-1971 Edgar Rhomberg 1971-1972 Laurie Jack 1972-1973 Tony Schelling
*1973-1974 Grahame Fane

1984 Antoine Van Dierendonck 1985 Donald Rippon

British Columbia Institute of Technology

  • Corporate body
  • 1964-

The British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) officially opened October 4, 1964. Areas of study available were: Engineering, Health and Business.

On January 17th, 1958, the Minister of Education for the Province of British Columbia, the Hon. L. R. Petersen announced the appointment of the Royal Commission on Education for the Province of British Columbia for the “purpose of reviewing and assessing the educational system with he aim of improving its effectiveness in the light of world conditions and providing guidance for its future development.” Concurrent with the Commissions inquiry the Provincial Curriculum Advisory Board of the Department of Education appointed a committee directed by Mr. D. E. Bridge of the Vocational Training Branch of the Department of Labour, Ottawa to survey “The Need for Advanced Technical and Vocational Training in British Columbia.” As a result of the Royal Commission on Education, the Bridge Report and financial assistance from the Federal Government, an Advisory Council was formed early 1961 to begin planning what would become the British Columbia Institute of Technology. Dr. J. English, Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education was appointed chairman and Mr. J. S. White, Director of Technical and Vocational Education, vice-chair.

Until 1974 BCIT was directly controlled and funded by the B.C. Department of Education, in partnership with an Advisory Council chosen from business and industry. The council appointed the Principal of BCIT as the Chief Executive Officer of the Institute. Two Vice-Principals were responsible for Administration and the growing Extension Division. The three divisions of Engineering, Business and Health were managed by three Directors reporting directly to the Principal. The Council formed seventeen advisory committees which met at least twice a year and advised Technology Heads at BCIT about the effectiveness of the programs being taught, opportunities for employment and updates in the industry. Recommendations went through the Principal who carried them to the main Advisory Council. In 1963, the Department of Education took a radical departure from existing government policy and allowed the BC Civil Service Commission to delegate responsibility for selecting teaching staff to the Institute, via the Advisory Council and Principal.

In 1972, the Minister of Education established a task force to recommend future directions for BCIT. A more autonomous relationship developed between the provincial government and BCIT with the passage of the British Columbia Institute of Technology Act on July 4, 1974. The Act established a new system of governance for BCIT under a fifteen–person Board of Governors. Under Section 11 (3) of the BCIT Act the Principal was required to submit an Annual Report to the Board of Governors for the educational year. The position of Principal was expanded to encompass linking functions both between the Board of Governors and BCIT, and between BCIT and the external community. The Principal assumed the responsibility of implementing Board policy and administering the budget; she also served as the chief means of mobilizing the institute’s resources in recognizing and clarifying issues and expediting decision making. At the same time, three Executive Director positions were created in the areas of Technical Education; Administration; and Personnel and Information Services and Student Services, in order that BCIT could effectively carry on day-to-day operations while implementing a variety of administrative systems. With the Directors of the five Educational Divisions, the Bursar, the Registrar, and the Coordinator of Planning Services, the Executive Directors were members of an Executive Committee, a consultative body which advised the Principal and served as a channel of communication between the Chief Executive Officer and the institutes staff, students and faculty.

In 1978 the Boards of the Pacific Vocational Institute (PVI) and BCIT established a Joint Boards Committee, enhancing the relationship of the neighbours and providing a forum for cooperation between the institutions in matters of mutual interest. On May 31, 1985, the Honourable John H. Heinrich, then Minister of Education announced the decision to amalgamate the Pacific Vocational Institute (PVI) and the British Columbia Institute of Technology. The merger culminated in a new organizational structure, a mission statement and a set of corporate objectives for BCIT. The expanded mandate for the new institution included:

• A centre of excellence for the trades
• The development of new technology programs
• The development of post diploma programs
• The development of bridging programs from trades to technology

The official merger took place on April 1, 1986. In July 1985, the President and the Board of Governors appointed Drug Svetic Vice President, Education; Duncan McPherson Vice President, Finance; Len McNeely Vice President, Administration; and Peter Jones Vice President, Student Services and Educational Support. The reorganization of BCIT’s educational division resulted five schools, adding an Executive Director of Trades Training and the introduction of an associate dean structure.

In 2004, BCIT's governing legislation became the College and Institute Act, RSBC 1996, ch. 5 (2). Under this Act, the President is defined as BCIT's Chief Executive Office, with the duty to “supervise and direct subject to bylaws, the instructional, administrative and other staff of the institution and exercise powers and perform duties assigned to the president by the board.” The President is to report to the Board annually on the progress of the Institute, make recommendations, and advise the Board on all matters concerning the operation of the Institute.

British Columbia Vocational School

  • Corporate body
  • 1960-06-29 to 1978-01-12

In 1960 the British Columbia Vocational School for trades training opened in BC in 1960. The British Columbia Premier at the time was Hon. W.A.C. Bennett, he gave the address at the opening ceremonies.
In May 1961, the provincial government provided funds for further expansion. The second phase of building was completed in late 1963 allowing those classes still remaining at the PNE to move in. In 1967, increases in enrollment lead to the creation of the BCVS Burnaby Lake Division. Located in rented facilities in the Pit Par Buildings at Winston St in Burnaby, the Burnaby Lake Division included Electrical, Ironworking, Boilermaking and Appliance Servicing training. In September 1967, Machinists’ Training was added to the BCVS Burnaby Campus.
BCVS initially offered fourteen courses which ranged from six months for most trades, to two years for aeronautics. Classes were divided into pre- apprenticeship, to prepare the student for employment as an apprentice; apprenticeship to give indentured apprentices further training; pre-employment to give individuals entry into skilled work areas of industry; and upgrading to provide training in special areas for journeymen already working in the field.
On July 9, 1976 a directive was issued by the Ministry of Education to the Superintendent of Post-secondary Programs, Henry Justesen to prepare reports and recommendations on vocational training in British Columbia. The subsequent recommendations, combined with recommendations from the Provincial Government’s Commission on Vocational –Technical and Trades Training in British Columbia, headed by Dean Goard Sr., recommended a new vocational institute be formed. Major components of the proposed institute would be the British Columbia Vocational School in Burnaby and the Haney Educational in Maple Ridge. Dr. Walter Hardwick, Deputy Minister of Education, formally named Henry Justesen as Chief Executive Officer of the new institute.
In March 1977 a five member British Columbia Vocational School Advisory Board was appointed by Education Minister Dr, Pat McGreer, to oversee the development of the new institute. Mr. Leslie R. Redford was named as Chairman of the Advisory Board. Other members included Frank Redder, Don Fearey, Jake Wyman, and Donald Doyle. The Board met once a month. In anticipation of the future merger, the Haney Educational Centre was renamed the “Pacific Vocational Institute - Maple Ridge Campus” in May 1977. On September 27, 1977, Bill 82 – The Colleges and Provincial Institutes Act was given Royal Assent by the British Columbia legislature. Under Part III of the Act, the Lieutenant Governor in Council could now designate Provincial Institutes.
Principals of BCVS were:
Colonel John W. Inglis 1960-1966
Mr. Lorne Smith 1966- 1976
Mr. J. Cooper 1976-1978

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